Political Science

Governing Divided Societies

Philip J. Howe, Thomas A. Lorman, Daniel E. Miller
The authors of this volume challenge conventional notions about Habsburg and Czechoslovak politics, arguing that they were more democratic than they often appear. At combining political science and history, the authors' guiding principle and means of analysis is the consociational model of democracy. This theory, linked best to Arend Lijphart, asserts that consociationalism guarantees...

The COVID-19 Intelligence Failure

Erik J. Dahl
The first in-depth analysis on the topic demonstrates why the years of predictions were not enough, drawing parallels to other warning failures from Pearl Harbor to 9/11 Epidemiologists and national security agencies warned for years about the potential for a deadly pandemic, but in the end global surveillance and warning systems were not enough to avert the COVID-19 disaster. How was it possible for the coronavirus to surprise the international community and become a...

Fixing American Cybersecurity

edited by Larry Clinton, foreword by Kiersten Todt, with contributions by Anthony Shapella, Lou DeSorbo, Jeffrey C. Brown, J.R. Williamson, Michael Higgins, Michael Gordon, Josh Higgins, Greg Montana, Gary McAlum, Kenneth Huh, Ryan Boulais, Jamison Gardner, Andy Kirkland, Alex Green, Richard Spearman, Carter Zheng, Tarun Krishnakumar, Larry Clinton
Advocates a cybersecurity "social contract" between government and business in seven key economic sectors. ...

Building Inclusive Communities in Rural Canada

edited by Clark Banack, Dionne Pohler
This collection challenges misconceptions that rural Canada is a bastion of intolerance. While examining the extent and nature of contemporary cultural and religious discrimination in rural Canadian communities, the editors and contributors explore the many efforts by rural citizens, community groups, and municipalities to counter intolerance, build inclusive communities, and become better neighbours. Throughout, scholars and community leaders focus on...

Open Society Unresolved

edited by Liviu Matei, Christof Royer
Is the concept of open society still relevant in the 21st century? Do the current social, moral, and political realities call for a drastic revision of this concept? Here fifteen essays address real-world contemporary challenges to open society from a variety of perspectives. What unites the individual authors and chapters is an interest in open society's continuing usefulness and relevance to address current problems. And what...

Subcontinental Drift

Rajesh Basrur
How domestic constraints hamper India's foreign policy and its potential as a superpower One of the most important developments in today's changing international system is the emergence of India as a rising power. However, Rajesh Basrur finds that India is held back by serious domestic constraints. Subcontinental Drift explains why India's foreign policy is often characterized by multiple hesitations, delays, and diversions that may ultimately hamper its rise. ...

A Life for Belarus

Stanislau Shushkevich
This memoir of the first president of an independent Belarus (1991-1994) tells about the revival of independent Belarus, the difficulties in establishing a democracy and a market economy, a hardened Soviet mentality, and the political immaturity of the intelligentsia and obduracy of the old nomenklatura. Stanislau Shushkevich, born in 1934, narrates his path from a son of an "enemy of the people" to a doctorate in physics, and then to be the first head of independent...

Liberals, Conservatives, and Mavericks

edited by Frank Cibulka, Zachary T. Irwin
No Church is monolithic—this is the preliminary premise of this volume on the public place of religion in a representative number of post-communist countries. The studies confirm that within any religious organization we can expect to find fissures, factions, theological or ideological quarrels, and perhaps even competing interest groups, such as missionary workers,...

American Defense Reform

Dave Oliver, Anand Toprani, foreword by Bill Owens
A roadmap for leading successful military innovation underscores close collaboration with civilians, based on past experience The United States military must be continually reshaped to adapt to evolving technologies, shifting adversaries, and a changing social environment for its personnel. However, introducing reform into the vast Department of Defense and its service branches is notoriously difficult. In American...

Catholicism and Liberal Democracy

James Martin Carr
Catholicism and Contemporary Liberal Democracy seeks to clarify if there is a place for Catholicism in the public discourse of modern liberal democracy, bringing secular liberalism, as articulated by Jürgen Habermas, into conversation with the Catholic tradition. James Martin Carr explores three aspects of the Catholic tradition relevant to this debate: the Church's response to democracy from the nineteenth century up until the eve of the Second Vatican...

Forbidden

edited by Drew Christiansen, Carole Sargent
Theologians and thought leaders' prescribe how to achieve Pope Francis' vision of a world without nuclear weapons In 2017, Pope Francis became the first pontiff to condemn possession—declaring that deterrence did not meet the standard of moral acceptability. The pope's statement at a Vatican symposium on nuclear arms in 2017 was praised by many of the 11 Nobel Peace Prize laureates, hundreds of church leaders, diplomats, scholars, and...

Mao's Army Goes to Sea

Toshi Yoshihara
The first detailed book in the West about the founding of China's navy and the significance of that founding era today From 1949 to 1950, the People's Liberation Army (PLA) made crucial decisions to establish a navy and secure China's periphery. The civil war had been fought with a peasant army, yet to capture key offshore islands from the Nationalist rival, Mao Zedong needed to develop maritime capabilities. Mao's Army Goes to Sea is a groundbreaking...

Inheriting the Bomb

Mariana Budjeryn
The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left its nearly 30,000 nuclear weapons spread over the territories of four newly sovereign states: Belarus, Kazakhstan, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. This collapse cast a shadow of profound ambiguity over the fate of the world's largest arsenal of the deadliest weapons ever created. In Inheriting the Bomb, Mariana Budjeryn reexamines the history of nuclear predicament caused by the Soviet collapse...

Restraining Air Power

Robert C. Owen
Is it possible for two combatants who possess equally strong air forces to conduct limited warfare by restraining air operations? In Restraining Air Power, Robert C. Owen and contributing authors aim to answer this question by providing theoretical and empirical assessments of restrained air warfare through five historical case studies since 1945. Through an objective analysis of the past, this collection evaluates the principles of escalation and escalation...

What the Eyes Can't See

Margaret Edds
The transformation of Governor Ralph Northam Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's "blackface scandal" could have destroyed any politician. The photo of Governor Northam purportedly in blackface created a firestorm not only locally but also in every political sphere. What the Eyes Can't See details why Northam's career did not end with the scandal, and how it made him a better governor—and a better citizen. In this book Margaret Edds draws on...

Defending the Republic

edited by Bruce P. Frohnen, Kenneth L. Grasso
In recent years, our constitutional order has increasingly come under attack as irredeemably undemocratic, racist, and oppressive. At the same time, it is increasingly obvious that politic practices in the United States have strayed very far from the founders' designs and become deeply dysfunctional. The time is thus ripe for renewed reflection about the American political tradition. This...

Activist Literacies

Jennifer Nish
A groundbreaking rhetorical framework for the study of transnational digital activism What does it mean when we call a movement "global"? How can we engage with digital activism without being "slacktivists"? In Activist Literacies, Jennifer Nish responds to these questions and a larger problem in contemporary public discourse: many discussions and analyses of digital and transnational activism rely on inaccurate language and inadequate frameworks. Drawing on...

Conservative Thought and American Constitutionalism since the New Deal

Johnathan O'Neill
The New Deal fundamentally changed the institutions of American constitutional government and, in turn, the relationship of Americans to their government. Johnathan O'Neill's Conservative Thought and American Constitutionalism since the New Deal examines how various types of conservative thinkers responded to this significant turning point in the second half of the twentieth century. O'Neill identifies four fundamental transformations engendered...

Disability Dialogues

Andrew J. Hogan
Disability activism has fundamentally changed American society for the better—and along with it, the views and practices of many clinical professionals. After 1945, disability self-advocates and family advocates pushed for the inclusion of more positive, inclusive, and sociopolitical perspectives on disability in clinical research, training, and practice. In Disability Dialogues, Andrew J. Hogan highlights the contributions of disabled...

Nature's Laboratory

Elizabeth Grennan Browning
In Nature's Laboratory, Elizabeth Grennan Browning argues that Chicago—a city characterized by rapid growth, severe labor unrest, and its position as a gateway to the West—offers the clearest lens for analyzing the history of the intellectual divide between countryside and city in the United States at the end of the nineteenth century. By examining both the material and intellectual underpinnings of Gilded Age and Progressive Era...