Literary Criticism

Embracing Vocation

Dianne C. Luce
Revelations on craft from a foundational scholar of Cormac McCarthy Devotees of Cormac McCarthy's novels are legion, and deservedly so. Embracing Vocation, which tells the tale of his journey to become one of America's greatest living writers, will be invaluable to scholars and literary critics—and to the many fans—interested in his work. Dianne C. Luce, a foundational scholar of McCarthy's writing, through extensive archival research, examines the first fifteen years...

The Academic Avant-Garde

Kimberly Quiogue Andrews
In The Academic Avant-Garde, Kimberly Quiogue Andrews makes a provocative case for the radical poetic possibilities of the work of literary scholarship and lays out a foundational theory of literary production in the context of the university. In her examination of the cross-pollination between the analytic humanities and the craft of poetry writing, Andrews tells a bold story about some of today's most innovative literary works. This pathbreaking intervention into...

Her Birth and Later Years

Irena Klepfisz
Collected poems of pivotal Jewish lesbian activist A trailblazing lesbian poet, child Holocaust survivor, and political activist whose work is deeply informed by socialist values, Irena Klepfisz is a vital and individual American voice. This book is the first complete collection of her work. For fifty years, Klepfisz has written powerful, searching poems about relatives murdered during the war, recent immigrants, a lost Yiddish writer, a Palestinian boy in Gaza, and...

Teaching the Global Middle Ages

edited by Geraldine Heng
Cultural interconnection informs this collection's view of the Middle Ages. Although globalism may seem like a modern phenomenon, people of the premodern world were also interconnected, sharing merchandise, technology, languages, and stories over long distances. Looking across civilizations, this volume takes a broad view of the Middle Ages in order to foster new habits of thinking and develop a multilayered, critical sense of the past. The essays in this volume reach across disciplinary...

Buffalo Dance, expanded edition

Frank X Walker
When Frank X Walker's compelling collection of personal poems was first released in 2004, it told the story of the infamous Lewis and Clark expedition from the point of view of York, who was enslaved to Clark and became the first African American man to traverse the continent. The fictionalized poems in Buffalo Dance form a narrative of York's inner journey before, during, and after the expedition—a journey from slavery to freedom, from the plantation to the great Northwest, from servant to soul...

In the Current Where Drowning Is Beautiful

Abigail Chabitnoy
A poetic re-visioning of narratives of violence against women and nature In the Current Where Drowning Is Beautiful is a meditation on water, land, women, and violent environmental changes as they affect both the natural world and human migration. The poet reckons with the unsettling realities that women experience, questioning the cause and effect of events and asking why stories of oppression are so often simply accepted as the only stories. Alutiiq language is used throughout...

Approaches to Teaching the Novels of James Fenimore Cooper

edited by Stephen Carl Arch, Keat Murray
Essays for teaching the iconic American themes of James Fenimore Cooper. A cosmopolitan author who spent nearly a decade in Europe and was versed in the works of his British and French contemporaries, James Fenimore Cooper was also deeply concerned with the America of his day and its history. His works embrace themes that have dominated American literature since: the frontier; the oppression of Native Americans by Europeans; questions of...

National Literature in Multinational States

edited by Albert Braz, Paul Morris
If literature has often informed the creation of a national imaginary—a sense of common history and destiny—it has also complicated, even challenged, the unifying vision assumed in the formation of a national literature and sense of nation. National Literature in Multinational States questions the persistent association of literature and nation-states, contrasting this with the reality of multinational and ethnocultural diversity. The contributors to this...

Before Borders

Stephanie DeGooyer
Before borders determined who belonged in a country and who did not, lawyers and judges devised a legal fiction called naturalization to bypass the idea of feudal allegiance and integrate new subjects into their nations. At the same time, writers of prose fiction were attempting to undo centuries of rules about who could—and who could not—be a subject of literature. In Before Borders, Stephanie DeGooyer reconstructs how prose and legal fictions came together in the...

In a Few Minutes Before Later

Brenda Hillman
"[Hillman's] work is fierce but loving, risk-taking, and beautiful." —Harvard Review An iconoclastic ecopoet who has led the way for many young and emerging artists, Brenda Hillman continues to re-cast innovative poetic forms as instruments for tracking human and non-human experiences. At times the poet deploys short dialogues, meditations or trance techniques as means of rendering inner states; other times she uses narrative, documentary or scientific materials to record daily events during a time...

Situating Poetry

Joshua Logan Wall
What happens if we approach the reading and writing of poetry not as an individual act, but as a public one? Answering this question challenges common assumptions about modern poetry and requires that we explore the important questions that define genre: Where is this poem situated, and how did it get there? Joshua Logan Wall's Situating Poetry studies five poets of the New York literary scene rarely considered together: James Weldon Johnson, Charles Reznikoff, Lola...

The Swedish Theory of Love

Henrik Berggren, Lars Trägårdh, translated by Stephen Donovan
In 2020 Sweden's response to COVID-19 drew renewed attention to the Nordic nation in a way that put the finger on a seeming paradox. Long celebrated for its commitment to social solidarity, Sweden suddenly emerged as the last country in the West to resist lockdown while defending individual rights and responsibilities. To explain these contradictions, Henrik Berggren and Lars Trägårdh argue that the long-standing...

Canadian Performance Documents and Debates

edited by Anthony J. Vickery, Glen F. Nichols, Allana C. Lindgren, foreword by Jerry Wasserman
Canadian Performance Documents and Debates provides insight into theatrical activities from the seventeenth century to the early 1970s, and probes important yet vexing questions about "Canada" as a country and a concept. The volume collects playscripts and archival material such as photographs, petitions, performance programs, and musical scores to explore what these documents tell us about...

Belly to the Brutal

Jennifer Givhan
Poetry for all the mothers and daughters healing the bloodlines Belly to the Brutal sings a corrido of the love between mothers and daughters, confronting the learned complicity with patriarchal violence passed down from generation to generation. This poetry edges into the borderlands, touching the realm of chora—humming, screaming, rhythm—transporting the words outside of patriarchal and racist constructs. Drawing from curanderisma and a revived wave of feminist brujería, Jennifer Givhan creates a healing space...

Lapis

Kerri Webster
A record of visionary experience in the wake of loss In Lapis, poet Kerri Webster writes into the vast space left by the deaths of three women: her mother, a mentor, and a friend. Using a wide array of lyric forms and meditations, Webster explores matrilineages both familial and poetic, weaving together death, spirituality, women, and a sense of the shifting earth into one "doctrine of Non-linear Revelation." Elegy And I was equal to my longing: the mums blackening; sorrow a carboned figurine; the firmament steaming; your...

Teaching Asian North American Texts

edited by Jennifer Ho, Jenny Heijun Wills
Essays for teaching Asian North American texts and their historical and cultural contexts. From the short stories and journalism of Sui Sin Far to Maxine Hong Kingston's pathbreaking The Woman Warrior to recent popular and critical successes such as Viet Thanh Nguyen's The Sympathizer, Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist, and Kevin Kwan's Crazy Rich Asians, Asian North American literature and media encompass a long history and a diverse variety of genres and...

Approaches to Teaching The Plum in the Golden Vase (The Golden Lotus)

edited by Andrew Schonebaum
The Plum in the Golden Vase (also known as The Golden Lotus) was published in the early seventeenth century and may be the first long work of Chinese fiction written by a single (though anonymous) author. Featuring both complex structural features and psychological and emotional realism, the novel centers on the rich merchant Ximen Qing and his household and describes the physical surroundings and material objects of a Ming dynasty city.

Hesiod, third edition

Apostolos N. Athanassakis
Next to the works of Homer, Hesiod's poems are foundational texts for students of the classics. His two major surviving works, the Theogony and the Works and Days, address the divine and the mundane, respectively. The Theogony traces the origins of the Greek gods and recounts the events surrounding the crowning of Zeus as their king, while the Works and Days is a manual of moral instruction in verse addressed to farmers and peasants. Though modern scholars dispute the authorship of the...

Citizenship on Catfish Row

Geoffrey Galt Harpham
A radical reinterpretation of three controversial works that illuminate racism and national identity in the United States Citizenship on Catfish Row focuses on three seminal works in the history of American culture: the first full-length narrative film, D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation; the first integrated musical, Oscar Hammerstein and Jerome Kern's Showboat; and the first great American opera, George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess. Each of these...

Shakespeare and the Idea of Western Civilization

R. V. Young
William Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the greatest writers of the Western world and most certainly its greatest playwright. His actual relationship to Western civilization has not, however, been thoroughly investigated. At a time when that civilization, as well as its premier dramatist, is subjected to severe and increasing criticism for both its supposed crimes against the rest of the world and its fundamental principles, a reassessment of the culture of the West is...